<p class="c0"><strong>Police and other rescuers ferry hurricane victims to safety in <a class="c13" href="http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/map-machine#s=r&amp;c=16.85261589772688,%20-99.9093132019043&amp;z=9">Acapulco, Mexico (map</a>) on September 18—a common scene across Mexico this week. The country has been hit by not one, but two <a class="c13" href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/hurricane-profile/">hurricanes</a> in recent days.</strong></p><p class="c0">Hurricanes&nbsp;<a class="c13" href="http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2013/graphics/al10/loop_5W.shtml">Ingrid</a> and&nbsp;<a class="c13" href="http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/graphics_ep3.shtml?gm_track#contents">Manuel</a> made landfall on opposite coasts within a day of each other. (Related:<a class="c13" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/09/130902-hurricanes-climate-change-superstorm-sandy-global-warming-storms-science-weather/">"Scientists: Climate Change May Offer Hurricane Help."</a>)</p><p class="c0">Manuel made landfall on September 15, as a tropical storm, initially killing at least 14 people, according to&nbsp;<a class="c13" href="http://www.miamiherald.com/2013/09/16/3629849/big-storms-hit-mexico-on-opposite.html">news reports</a>. After bumping along up the coast, the storm gained strength and became Hurricane Manuel on September 18. (Related:<a class="c13" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/07/130717-gps-hurricane-wind-speeds-remote-sensing/"> "GPS Reveals Hurricane Wind Speeds."</a>)</p><p class="c0"><a class="c13" href="http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/archive/2013/graphics/al10/loop_5W.shtml">Hurricane Ingrid</a> made landfall early September 16 near&nbsp;<a class="c13" href="http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/map-machine#s=r&amp;c=23.784686455525634,%20-97.7780532836914&amp;z=7">La Pesca, Mexico (map)</a> on the country's east coast. The&nbsp;<a class="c13" href="http://www.npr.org/blogs/thetwo-way/2013/09/19/223997593/death-toll-at-80-and-likely-to-rise-as-storms-slam-mexico">death toll currently stands at 80</a> for both hurricanes Ingrid and Manuel, with more storms forecast for later this week.</p><p class="c0">"To say exactly how rare this is would require some analysis of the historical data, but I'm sure it's safe to say that it's quite rare to have two hurricanes affecting land so close in location and time," <a class="c13" href="http://www.ssec.wisc.edu/~kossin/">James Kossin</a>, an atmospheric scientist with the U.S. National Climatic Data Center, said by email.</p><p class="c0">—<em>Jane J. Lee</em></p>

Rescue Effort

Police and other rescuers ferry hurricane victims to safety in Acapulco, Mexico (map) on September 18—a common scene across Mexico this week. The country has been hit by not one, but two hurricanes in recent days.

Hurricanes Ingrid and Manuel made landfall on opposite coasts within a day of each other. (Related:"Scientists: Climate Change May Offer Hurricane Help.")

Manuel made landfall on September 15, as a tropical storm, initially killing at least 14 people, according to news reports. After bumping along up the coast, the storm gained strength and became Hurricane Manuel on September 18. (Related: "GPS Reveals Hurricane Wind Speeds.")

Hurricane Ingrid made landfall early September 16 near La Pesca, Mexico (map) on the country's east coast. The death toll currently stands at 80 for both hurricanes Ingrid and Manuel, with more storms forecast for later this week.

"To say exactly how rare this is would require some analysis of the historical data, but I'm sure it's safe to say that it's quite rare to have two hurricanes affecting land so close in location and time," James Kossin, an atmospheric scientist with the U.S. National Climatic Data Center, said by email.

Jane J. Lee

Photograph by Pedro Mera, Xinhua Press/Corbis

Pictures: Mexico Hurricanes Pack a Rare Double Whammy

Rare back-to-back hurricanes, Ingrid and Manuel, have caused widespread flooding and landslides, killing over a dozen people.

Read This Next

Can science help personalize your diet?
Hogs are running wild in the U.S.—and spreading disease
Salman Rushdie on the timeless beauty of the Taj Mahal

Go Further

Subscriber Exclusive Content

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet

Why are people so dang obsessed with Mars?

How viruses shape our world

The era of greyhound racing in the U.S. is coming to an end

See how people have imagined life on Mars through history

See how NASA’s new Mars rover will explore the red planet