<p><strong>The messy remnants of a star's death, a <a href="http://www.nasa.gov/audience/forstudents/5-8/what-is-a-supernova.html#.VBMaUy5dV14">supernova</a>, surges into space in this image released September 10. Located about 7,000 light-years away from Earth, the initial explosion of the star would have been seen from our planet about 3,700 years ago.</strong></p><p>Pictures from both the <a href="http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/main/#.VBMaki5dV14">Chandra X-ray Observatory</a> and the <a href="http://xmm.esac.esa.int/">XMM-Newton</a> combine to form the most detailed view of this particular supernova yet, seen in the view above. Low-energy x-rays glow in red, medium-energy ones are green, and high-energy x-rays are blue. (See <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/08/140821-star-supernova-primordial-space-first-generation/">"Scientists Find Remnants of One of Universe's Oldest Stars—And It's Huge."</a>)</p><p><em>—Photo Gallery by Nicole Werbeck, Text by Jane J. Lee</em></p>

Psychedelic Supernova

The messy remnants of a star's death, a supernova, surges into space in this image released September 10. Located about 7,000 light-years away from Earth, the initial explosion of the star would have been seen from our planet about 3,700 years ago.

Pictures from both the Chandra X-ray Observatory and the XMM-Newton combine to form the most detailed view of this particular supernova yet, seen in the view above. Low-energy x-rays glow in red, medium-energy ones are green, and high-energy x-rays are blue. (See "Scientists Find Remnants of One of Universe's Oldest Stars—And It's Huge.")

—Photo Gallery by Nicole Werbeck, Text by Jane J. Lee

Photograph by Chandra X-ray Observatory Center/NASA

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