<p>The two stars at the center of the Twin Jet Nebula are dying. The smaller of the two is already a <a href="http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/space/universe/white-dwarfs-article/">white dwarf</a>, and its orbit around its partner is pulling gas ejected from the larger star into the two lobes pictured.</p>

Death Throes

The two stars at the center of the Twin Jet Nebula are dying. The smaller of the two is already a white dwarf, and its orbit around its partner is pulling gas ejected from the larger star into the two lobes pictured.

Photograph by ESA/Hubble & NASA Acknowledgement: Judy Schmidt

Week's Best Space Pictures: Bipolar Stars and a Radio Phoenix

The sun illuminates icy fountains on one of Saturn's moons and wildfires rage around Lake Baikal.

Feed your need for "heavenly" views of the universe every Friday with our picks of the most awe-inspiring space pictures. This week, dying stars put on a light show, a volcano reawakens, and a galactic collision re-energizes an electron cloud.

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