<p><strong>Kim Johnson on Tuesday surveys the destruction around her flooded apartment in Atlantic City, <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/united-states/new-jersey-guide/">New Jersey</a>—one of several southern New Jersey coastal communities that bore the brunt of <a href="http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/refresh/graphics_at3+shtml/153841.shtml?gm_psurge">Hurricane Sandy</a>'s storm surge Monday night. Rivers of seawater gushed down city streets, swamped buildings, and destroyed a section of the <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/top-10/us-boardwalks/">city's iconic boardwalk</a>. </strong></p><p> "The level of devastation at the Jersey Shore is unthinkable," New Jersey Governor <a href="http://www.state.nj.us/governor/">Chris Christie</a> told reporters in a Tuesday morning briefing. </p><p> As of Tuesday, Sandy's <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/united-states-guide/">U.S.</a> death toll stood at 38, many of whom were victims of downed trees and <a href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/hurricane-profile/">hurricane</a>-force winds that howled at up to 80 miles (129 kilometers) an hour. The disaster left more than 8.2 million people without power, and travel ground to a halt in, around, and above many Northeast cities. </p><p> (Related: "<a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2012/10/121030-hurricane-sandy-science-weather-nation-storm-path/">Sandy Far From Finished: Why Storm's Still Super, Headed for New Targets</a>.") </p><p><em> —Brian Handwerk</em></p>

Calm After the Storm

Kim Johnson on Tuesday surveys the destruction around her flooded apartment in Atlantic City, New Jersey—one of several southern New Jersey coastal communities that bore the brunt of Hurricane Sandy's storm surge Monday night. Rivers of seawater gushed down city streets, swamped buildings, and destroyed a section of the city's iconic boardwalk.

"The level of devastation at the Jersey Shore is unthinkable," New Jersey Governor Chris Christie told reporters in a Tuesday morning briefing.

As of Tuesday, Sandy's U.S. death toll stood at 38, many of whom were victims of downed trees and hurricane-force winds that howled at up to 80 miles (129 kilometers) an hour. The disaster left more than 8.2 million people without power, and travel ground to a halt in, around, and above many Northeast cities.

(Related: "Sandy Far From Finished: Why Storm's Still Super, Headed for New Targets.")

—Brian Handwerk

Photograph by Mario Tama, Getty Images

Hurricane Sandy Pictures: Floods, Fire, Snow in the Aftermath

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