<p>A 10.5-billion-year-old star cluster some 35,000 light-years away, called NGC 6496, is space's version of a heavy-metal band: Its stars are richer in elements heavier than hydrogen and helium than stars in similar clusters.</p>

Rainbow in the Dark

A 10.5-billion-year-old star cluster some 35,000 light-years away, called NGC 6496, is space's version of a heavy-metal band: Its stars are richer in elements heavier than hydrogen and helium than stars in similar clusters.

Photograph by ESA/Hubble/NASA

Week’s Best Space Pictures: Stars Form a Heavy-Metal Band

Also, New Horizons spies Pluto's beating heart, and a "little fox" births enormous stars.

Feed your need for heavenly views of the universe with our picks of the most awe-inspiring space pictures.

This week, astronauts gaze down at the world's largest biological structure, moons coast past the outskirts of Saturn's rings, and the European Space Agency's Herschel infrared telescope spots the largest possible star types.

Follow Michael Greshko on Twitter.

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