<p>With its EOS 5D camera, Canon introduced a relatively small, affordable full-35mm-size digital camera. It was an instant hit with photographers who make their livings traveling around the world. Up until the EOS 5D, full-frame cameras were large and heavy. Many photographers felt hampered under the significant weight of their huge state-of-the-art cameras. The 5D cameras were classified as "prosumer" cameras, lacking some of the features of Canon's rapidly focusing, higher megapixel, made-for-professionals cameras. But because the full-frame sensor produced such great images, many photographers were happy to lighten their load, even if the camera was a little slower to operate. The second version of this camera included HD video recording on its full-frame sensor. This was a groundbreaking feature, creating a whole new generation of wannabe filmmakers. The video quality is so good that Canon 5D Mark IIs were used to film an entire episode of the TV show <em>House</em>.</p><p>Now in its third version, the camera's slowness is gone, and you'll find it hanging around the neck of many National Geographic photographers. Amy Toensing feels that Canon had her in mind with this camera, saying: "It was exciting to have the 5D series come out as a woman. The camera fits very well in my hands, and when you're trying to do intimate work, it's pretty low profile. Even though it's not the fastest camera, the files are gorgeous. What good is having the biggest, fastest, highest megapixel camera if you're not able to gain the trust of your subjects?"</p><p><strong></strong><strong>Sensor:</strong> 22.3MP 35mm full-frame</p><p><strong>Good for:</strong> Travel and documentary work</p><p><strong>Get it:</strong> <a href="http://www.usa.canon.com/cusa/consumer/products/cameras/slr_cameras/eos_5d_mark_iii" target="_blank">www.canon.com</a></p><p><a href="http://proof.nationalgeographic.com/2014/07/23/amy-toensing-on-hunger-in-america-iowas-breadbasket/" target="_blank"><em>See Amy's work with this camera on National Geographic's Proof photo blog.</em></a></p>

Amy Toensing, Canon 5D Mark III

With its EOS 5D camera, Canon introduced a relatively small, affordable full-35mm-size digital camera. It was an instant hit with photographers who make their livings traveling around the world. Up until the EOS 5D, full-frame cameras were large and heavy. Many photographers felt hampered under the significant weight of their huge state-of-the-art cameras. The 5D cameras were classified as "prosumer" cameras, lacking some of the features of Canon's rapidly focusing, higher megapixel, made-for-professionals cameras. But because the full-frame sensor produced such great images, many photographers were happy to lighten their load, even if the camera was a little slower to operate. The second version of this camera included HD video recording on its full-frame sensor. This was a groundbreaking feature, creating a whole new generation of wannabe filmmakers. The video quality is so good that Canon 5D Mark IIs were used to film an entire episode of the TV show House.

Now in its third version, the camera's slowness is gone, and you'll find it hanging around the neck of many National Geographic photographers. Amy Toensing feels that Canon had her in mind with this camera, saying: "It was exciting to have the 5D series come out as a woman. The camera fits very well in my hands, and when you're trying to do intimate work, it's pretty low profile. Even though it's not the fastest camera, the files are gorgeous. What good is having the biggest, fastest, highest megapixel camera if you're not able to gain the trust of your subjects?"

Sensor: 22.3MP 35mm full-frame

Good for: Travel and documentary work

Get it: www.canon.com

See Amy's work with this camera on National Geographic's Proof photo blog.

Photograph courtesy Canon

Our Photographers' Favorite Cameras

National Geographic photographers reveal the cameras they use to capture world-renowned pictures. —Dan Westergren, director of photography, National Geographic Travel

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