<p><br> Sunlight bursts through a trilithon at Stonehenge, located on <a href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/countries/united-kingdom-guide/" target="_blank">England</a>'s Salisbury Plain. Built on an already ancient earthen structure, the monument comprises bluestones brought from a distance of more than 150 miles and larger sarsen stones, believed to have been brought from Marlborough Downs, about 19 miles away.</p>

Circle of Light


Sunlight bursts through a trilithon at Stonehenge, located on England's Salisbury Plain. Built on an already ancient earthen structure, the monument comprises bluestones brought from a distance of more than 150 miles and larger sarsen stones, believed to have been brought from Marlborough Downs, about 19 miles away.

Photograph by Steve Vidler, eStock Photo

World Heritage Site Pictures: Stonehenge

Dating to around 2500 B.C. and situated on a landscape rich with the remnants of ancient life and ceremony, Stonehenge has been an enduring source of speculation. Who erected it and how? What was its purpose? Though recent discoveries have answered many questions about its origins, the long-studied monument remains enigmatic.

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