Successful Marburg Virus Treatment Offers Hope for Ebola Patients

A new approach, similar to one previously tested on Ebola, saved monkeys up to three days after infection with Marburg virus.

A new treatment has successfully protected monkeys infected with Marburg virus, a disease with a course so similar to Ebola's that it's impossible to clinically differentiate the two, scientists announced Wednesday.

Though the technique has not yet been tested in people, the development has researchers noting that what's helpful for Marburg could well be helpful for Ebola, which is now seeing its worst-ever outbreak, claiming more than 1,350 lives in West Africa.

"This technology may have potential for combatting Ebola," says Thomas Geisbert of the University of Texas Medical Branch in Galveston, senior author of the study, published in the journal Science Translational Medicine.

The study marks the first time that a group of primates could be protected from

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