<p>An electric ray, also called a Pacific torpedo, prowls a kelp forest off the western coast of North America. These large flattened rays often lie partially buried on sandy seafloors, where they use a specialized sensory system to detect the electrical stimuli of potential prey and then attack them by ambush. The predator wraps its body around a halibut or mackerel and uses special kidney-shaped organs to produce a stunning electric charge of up to 50 volts.</p>

Pacific Torpedo Ray

An electric ray, also called a Pacific torpedo, prowls a kelp forest off the western coast of North America. These large flattened rays often lie partially buried on sandy seafloors, where they use a specialized sensory system to detect the electrical stimuli of potential prey and then attack them by ambush. The predator wraps its body around a halibut or mackerel and uses special kidney-shaped organs to produce a stunning electric charge of up to 50 volts.

Photograph by Phillip Colla, SeaPics.com

Electroreceptive Fish

The electric ray, and other fish, have the biological ability to perceive natural electrical stimuli.

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