<p>The peanut worm has a proboscis that resembles an elephant’s trunk, as well as a mouth that boasts an impressive array of tentacles. This bottom burrower feeds on organic materials found in mud and sand, and when done feasting it can turn the proboscis inside out to retract it inside its body. Peanut worms are often tiny but can reach 1.5 feet (0.5 meters) in length.</p>

Peanut Worm

The peanut worm has a proboscis that resembles an elephant’s trunk, as well as a mouth that boasts an impressive array of tentacles. This bottom burrower feeds on organic materials found in mud and sand, and when done feasting it can turn the proboscis inside out to retract it inside its body. Peanut worms are often tiny but can reach 1.5 feet (0.5 meters) in length.

Photograph by Darlyne A. Murawski, National Geographic

Marine Worms

A marine worm may resemble a feather duster, a leaf, or even a plate of pasta—and these creatures’ amazing abilities are as varied as their appearances.

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