National Geographic and Rolex Committed to a Perpetual Planet

Mountains. Rainforests. The ocean. These critical Earth systems provide some of the most basic needs for life on Earth: water, oxygen, a stable climate. But these systems are increasingly at risk due to global environmental challenges like climate change.

That’s why National Geographic and Rolex have partnered to support trailblazing scientific research, expeditions, and solutions to increase our understanding of the threats facing the planet’s life support systems and drive action to address them.

Together, the partnership supports a series of expeditions to examine the impact of climate and environmental change on the planet’s most fragile iconic environments, to document the changes occurring and the implications for people and wildlife.

LATEST RESEARCH

Scientists from around the world have collaborated on new research showing that glacier-based mountain water systems around the world are at risk, in many cases critically, due to growing environmental pressures. By identifying the most relied upon, and most vulnerable, of these water towers, this research aims to help prioritize the protection of these critical systems.

Read the full paper here.

EVEREST EXPEDITION

The National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Expedition to Mt. Everest was the most comprehensive single scientific expedition to this iconic mountain in history. The team installed the two highest weather stations in the world and collected the highest ice core ever recorded.

Explore hourly weather information from the mountain, as well as historic and future projections of snow and ice cover below.

Explore the World’s Most Important Water Towers
Learn more about these global water towers — and about the water flowing in and out of these critical systems and the threats they face.
Follow Everest Weather Updates
Get the latest weather data directly from stations located across the mountain. From hourly temperature readings over the last five days, see how dramatically the weather can fluctuate.

National Geographic Society + Rolex

Our innovative partnership supports exploration of some of the most extreme environments on the planet to gain insights into the systems that support life on Earth.

Learn More
Expedition Videos
Experience what drives researchers to study one of the most extreme environments on the planet
Experience what drives researchers to study one of the most extreme environments on the planet
Climb with a team of scientists who see Everest in a way others don't: as a living laboratory
Climb with a team of scientists who see Everest in a way others don't: as a living laboratory
Creating a virtual reconstruction of Everest Base Camp
Creating a virtual reconstruction of Everest Base Camp
How alpine species are adapting to climate change
How alpine species are adapting to climate change
What mud from glacial lakes can tell us about our history and future
What mud from glacial lakes can tell us about our history and future
Latest Stories
Sylvia Earle and marine scientists work to protect our oceans’ ecosystem.
Sylvia Earle and marine scientists work to protect our oceans’ ecosystem.
Microplastics found near Everest’s peak, highest ever detected in the world
Microplastics found near Everest’s peak, highest ever detected in the world
Climb with a team of scientists who see Everest in a way others don't: as a living laboratory
Climb with a team of scientists who see Everest in a way others don't: as a living laboratory
Experience what drives researchers to study one of the most extreme environments on the planet
Experience what drives researchers to study one of the most extreme environments on the planet
How scientists turned the world’s highest mountain into a climate laboratory
How scientists turned the world’s highest mountain into a climate laboratory
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Meet the Expedition Team Leads