WATCH: More than 30 pre-Columbian urns containing human remains were uncovered in the capital city of Nicaragua.

During the construction of what was intended to be a new baseball stadium in the capital city of Nicaragua, construction workers didn't expect the debris and earth they cleared to have the thousand-year-old remains of a society untouched by Spanish conquistadors.

A massive cemetery containing human bones and large funerary urns was found in western Managua by Nicaragua's National Electric Transmission Company, which had been digging a ditch for a substation intended to support the new stadium.

More than 30 pre-Columbian urns containing human remains have been found so far. Funeral and animal faces adorn many of the urns.

The archaeology department at the Nicaraguan Institute of Culture told local press that the finds date from 800 to 1350 CE during the

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