Our aim: To illuminate and protect

The National Geographic Society’s plans for 2020 celebrate milestones and back science, exploration, biodiversity, says President and COO Mike Ulica.

The National Geographic Society uses the power of science, exploration, education, and storytelling to illuminate and protect the wonder of our world. With this mission statement, we honor our legacy as a 131-year-old global nonprofit and the principles that will guide our work in the years ahead.

As we start 2020, I’d like to share our plans for what will truly be a consequential year. We will commemorate important milestones, such as the 50th anniversary of Earth Day. We’ll celebrate the 60th anniversary of Jane Goodall’s arrival in what is now Gombe National Park, with an immersive museum exhibit at our headquarters in Washington, D.C. And National Geographic will join world leaders at the Convention on Biological Diversity meeting in Kunming, China, to help inform a post-2020 framework for supporting global biodiversity.

In each instance, the Society’s contributions will be driven by our unique approach. We illuminate the world’s wonders by exploring a subject and bringing it to life with powerful storytelling. We protect what is wonderful by taking action to safeguard the planet’s critical resources and inhabitants.

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