<p><a href="http://www.esa.int/Our_Activities/Space_Science/Mars_Express/Echus_Chasma">Echus Chasma</a>, a region north of Mars’ Valles Marineris canyons, shows curving patterns of light and dark. The area shown was flooded by lava flows, producing rough and smooth surfaces that collected bright dust differently.</p>

Study in Contrasts

Echus Chasma, a region north of Mars’ Valles Marineris canyons, shows curving patterns of light and dark. The area shown was flooded by lava flows, producing rough and smooth surfaces that collected bright dust differently.

Photograph by NASA/JPL/University of Arizona

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