Photographing the Civil Rights Movement: Danny Lyon and Julian Bond

Photographer and filmmaker Danny Lyon was the keynote speaker at the 2014 National Geographic Photography Seminar—an annual celebration of photography held at the society’s headquarters in Washington.

Lyon captured some of the civil rights movement’s most compelling moments, from the March on Washington, to the aftermath of the 16th Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, Alabama. For other projects, he immersed himself deeply with his subjects—including the Chicago Outlaws Motorcycle Club, and death-row prisoners in Texas.

Lyon was interviewed at the seminar by Julian Bond—a politician, professor, writer, and civil rights leader. The two first met in the 1960s when Lyon became the photographer for the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) in Chicago. Bond was one of the founding members.

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