Photographed from a rare vantage point, several of the Statue of Liberty's 25 observation windows look out over New York Harbor in an undated picture. Visitor access to the Statue of Liberty's crown reopens on the Fourth of July for the first time since 9/11. (Full story: <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/07/090702-statue-of-liberty-facts.html">"Statue of Liberty Facts: July 4th Reopening and More."</a>)<br> <br> Above the windows are three of the seven skyscraping rays said by some to represent the seven seas and continents of the world.
Photographed from a rare vantage point, several of the Statue of Liberty's 25 observation windows look out over New York Harbor in an undated picture. Visitor access to the Statue of Liberty's crown reopens on the Fourth of July for the first time since 9/11. (Full story: "Statue of Liberty Facts: July 4th Reopening and More.")

Above the windows are three of the seven skyscraping rays said by some to represent the seven seas and continents of the world.
Photograph by Paul Chesley, NGS Image Collection

Statue of Liberty Photos: Rare Views, Inside and Out

Uncommon vantage points reveal captivating angles of Lady Liberty.

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