<p><strong>After a flash <a id="e4c." title="flood" href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/floods-profile">flood</a>, a damaged minivan leans against a tree at the Albert Pike Recreation Area in Langley, <a id="m.3m" title="Arkansas" href="http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/united-states/arkansas-guide/">Arkansas</a> (see <a id="k3-5" title="map" href="http://maps.nationalgeographic.com/maps/map-machine#s=r&amp;c=33.73347670599253, -92.82623291015625&amp;z=8">map of the state's southwestern region</a>), on June 12.</strong></p><p>The vehicle was swept up and tossed around during the Arkansas flash flood, caused by the swelling of the Little Missouri River early on June 11. The flooding sent a wall of water rushing through the Ouachita Naitonal Forest early Friday, sweeping away campsites and cabins in the middle of the night, according to the AFP news service. (See <a id="ftjf" title="pictures of floods around the world." href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/photos/floods-general/#utah-flood-road_419_600x450.jpg">pictures of floods around the world.</a>)</p><p>Rescue workers on Monday found the last victim in the river, bringing the death toll to 20.</p><p>Floodwaters rose as quickly as 8 feet (2.4 meters) per second—so fast that the currents peeled asphalt from the road and stripped bark from trees, according to news reports.</p>

Tossed by Flash Flood

After a flash flood, a damaged minivan leans against a tree at the Albert Pike Recreation Area in Langley, Arkansas (see map of the state's southwestern region), on June 12.

The vehicle was swept up and tossed around during the Arkansas flash flood, caused by the swelling of the Little Missouri River early on June 11. The flooding sent a wall of water rushing through the Ouachita Naitonal Forest early Friday, sweeping away campsites and cabins in the middle of the night, according to the AFP news service. (See pictures of floods around the world.)

Rescue workers on Monday found the last victim in the river, bringing the death toll to 20.

Floodwaters rose as quickly as 8 feet (2.4 meters) per second—so fast that the currents peeled asphalt from the road and stripped bark from trees, according to news reports.

Photograph by Mike Stone, Reuters

Pictures: Arkansas Flash Flood Aftermath

Flood-tossed RVs and mangled campsites were left behind after a flash flood ripped through a national forest in Arkansas last weekend, killing at least 20.

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