Google Doodle Honors Legendary Female Scientist Rosalind Franklin

Rosalind Franklin, known for her work on DNA, would have turned 93 today.

Rosalind Franklin, a female British biophysicist who is best known for her work in the 1950s, would have turned 93 today. Today's Google logo illustrates her most important discovery: an arrow follows her line of vision to the center of a DNA strand, the structure of which she photographed in 1951.

Franklin was in many ways responsible for our current understanding of DNA structures, but history has largely excluded her from recognition up until recent years.

Born in 1920 in London, Rosalind Franklin used x-rays to take a picture of DNA that would change biology.

Hers is perhaps one of the most well-known—and shameful—instances of a researcher being robbed of credit, said Ruth Lewin Sime, a retired chemistry professor at Sacramento City College

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