How Syria's Chemical Weapons Could Be Disposed Of

If the Assad regime agrees to hand over weapons, much will need to be done.

The plan to take over Assad's stores of chemical weapons has not yet been approved, but leaders in the U.S., Great Britain, and France have said they are looking into the proposal, which is also receiving consideration at the United Nations. President Obama had already called on Congress to approve strikes against targets in Syria after Assad's regime crossed a "red line" by allegedly using chemical weapons in recent weeks.

Still, the removal of chemical weapons "would be nearly impossible to actually carry out," warned national security expert Yochi Dreazen on the Foreign Policy blog. Complications and dangers from the ongoing civil war and the scope of necessary remediation efforts are daunting, he warns. On top of that, Congressional

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