<p>On April 18, the team operating NASA’s <a href="https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/msl/index.html">Curiosity</a>&nbsp;rover used a camera on its arm to inspect its own punctured wheels. The wheels were first damaged in 2013, and should hold up long enough for Curiosity to complete its mission on Mars.</p>

Holey Rollers

On April 18, the team operating NASA’s Curiosity rover used a camera on its arm to inspect its own punctured wheels. The wheels were first damaged in 2013, and should hold up long enough for Curiosity to complete its mission on Mars.

Photograph by NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

Week’s Best Space Pictures: Lasers Guide a Telescope’s Gaze

Cassini sees Earth from Saturn’s point of view, and the Curiosity rover on Mars examines its injured wheels.

Feed your need for heavenly views of the universe with our pick of the most awe-inspiring space pictures.

This week, galaxy clusters shimmer in X-rays, Cassini re-creates the classic “Pale Blue Dot” photograph, and satellites capture a strange seascape.

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