<p>Earth can be seen as a point of light between Saturn's icy rings in this photo taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.</p>

Earth can be seen as a point of light between Saturn's icy rings in this photo taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft.

Photograph courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

See Earth and Its Moon From Saturn in Stunning New NASA Photo

Images of Earth and the moon together, taken from various spacecraft, show us what we look like from space.

Watch Mission Saturn Friday, September 15 9/8C on National Geographic.

NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which is currently dipping through Saturn's rings in its final days exploring the planet, captured an image of Earth (and its moon) seen as tiny points of light between Saturn's rings.

Shot from 870 million miles (1.4 billion kilometers) away from Earth on April 12, the view from Saturn puts our water planet into perspective. Though too far away to see in the image, the southern Atlantic ocean faces Saturn in the photographs.

The moon can be seen as a much fainter dot, suspended near the Earth in a zoomed-in version of the image.

Pictures of Earth from Space

Over the years, many other spacecraft have endeavored to capture the otherworldly sight of the Earth and moon together.

Astronauts on the moon and on the International Space Station have the unique perspective of seeing one appear to rise behind the other with Earthrises and moonrises.

Other spacecraft, when pointed toward Earth, have captured incredible views: Earth behind Saturn’s rings and pictured at many angles in clear detail, with the moon at its side.

Taking photographs of the Earth and moon together, from different perspectives, can help expose details not commonly seen, such as the makeup of the far side of the moon, only known since the beginning of the space age.

In the coming months, Cassini will continue to orbit Saturn's rings and the HiRISE, which has been photographing the Earth from Mars, will keep going on its route around the red planet. These and other spacecraft will continue to provide a second look at the Earth.

Originally published January 17, 2017. Updated April 23.

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