<p>A total lunar eclipse looms behind the TransAmerica building in San Francisco, California. Because of a confluence of cosmic events, the celestial spectacle was dubbed a “super blood wolf moon.”<br> </p>

A total lunar eclipse looms behind the TransAmerica building in San Francisco, California. Because of a confluence of cosmic events, the celestial spectacle was dubbed a “super blood wolf moon.”

Photograph by David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

January's best space pictures: Blood moon and dying star

Also see stars glittering in distant galaxies and China's historic moon landing up-close.

Feed your need for heavenly views of the universe with our picks of the most awe-inspiring space pictures from January 2019.

This month, talented photographers turned their cameras skyward to glimpse the decade's last total lunar eclipse, and the New Horizons probe zoomed by the most distant world ever visited by a spacecraft. Closer to home, China's Chang'e-4 lander made history on the moon's far side, and the Hubble Space Telescope captured stunning views of starry galaxies near and far—including one of the best views ever made of one of our cosmic neighbors.

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