NASA Gets Last Close Look at This Eerie Alien Moon

After a poignant farewell flyby of Saturn’s largest moon, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft is on a collision course with the ringed planet itself.

Watch Mission Saturn Friday, September 15 9/8C on National Geographic.

On April 21, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft paid its final visit to Saturn’s largest moon, swooping roughly 600 miles above Titan’s haze-wrapped surface.

This last hurrah, the 127th time Cassini flew by Titan, forms what scientists hope will be an intermediate bookend to the exploration of the alien world—a realm that really started to come into focus 12 years ago when a small spacecraft parachuted through the moon’s thick, extraterrestrial haze and drifted down toward its surface.

During its descent and brief moments among the rock-hard icy pebbles strewn over the ground, the probe gathered enough data to give scientists a glimpse of a moon that looks deceptively Earth-like.

Nearly 900 million miles from the sun, temperatures on Titan are so low that

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