<p>This false-color x-ray image shows the G11.2-0.3 supernova remnant as it looked 16,000 years ago. New observations have cast doubt on the idea <a href="http://chandra.harvard.edu/photo/2016/g11/">that Chinese astronomers saw this supernova explode in A.D. 386.</a></p>

Mistaken Identity

This false-color x-ray image shows the G11.2-0.3 supernova remnant as it looked 16,000 years ago. New observations have cast doubt on the idea that Chinese astronomers saw this supernova explode in A.D. 386.

Photograph by NASA/CXC/NCSU/K.Borkowski

Gaze at a Supernova's Dazzling Remains

Also this week, arches of plasma stream above the sun's surface, and satellites spot massive fires from space.

Feed your need for heavenly views of the universe with our pick of the most awe-inspiring space pictures.

This week, supernova remnants glow in x-rays, two of Saturn's moons appear deceptively close together, and the sun spits out scorching arches of plasma.

Follow Michael Greshko on Twitter.

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