The need to save more seeds, and other science news

Experts call for additional seed-saving methods, a pine forest accidentally escapes logging, and tree rings record earthquakes.

An estimated 8 percent of plant species—including about a third of endangered and vulnerable ones—have recalcitrant seeds that won’t tolerate drying, says a study in the journal Nature Plants. That means typical seed bank processes won’t work for those species, so experts urge additional measures, such as cryopreservation, to guard against their extinction. —Hicks Wogan

In the late 1800s and early 1900s, loggers clear-cut pines in Minnesota’s North Woods—but some remain, thanks to a mapping error.

A surveying slipup 140 years ago spared a patch of old-growth pine forest in northern Minnesota from the saws and axes of the region’s logging boom. Now the trees—the kind that once filled the area’s famed North Woods—are estimated at up to 400 years old.

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