<p><strong>The New Orleans Saints play a preseason game Saturday against the Houston Texans in the Louisiana Superdome (top)—a whole different ball game from five years ago, when the stadium was a makeshift shelter for victims of <a id="cl10" title="Hurricane Katrina" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/09/0902_050902_katrina_coverage.html">Hurricane Katrina</a>. (See <a id="t_2-" title="a picture of the Superdome roof right after the storm." href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/08/0829_050829_superdome.html">a picture of the torn-apart Superdome roof right after the storm</a>.) </strong></p><p>As the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina's Gulf Coast landfall approaches, many <a id="u9pi" title="hurricane" href="http://environment.nationalgeographic.com/environment/natural-disasters/hurricane-profile/">hurricane</a> survivors are still homeless, according to a new report by the homeless-advocacy group <a id="a8pz" title="Unity of Greater New Orleans" href="http://unitygno.org/">Unity of Greater New Orleans</a>, local TV station WWLV.com reported.</p><p>Hundreds of Katrina victims are living in the more than 55,000 ramshackle buildings that were abandoned after the hurricane destroyed much of the city, according to the report.</p><p>(Related <a id="dtuv" title="video: &quot;5 Years After Katrina, Ruins—And a Natural Wonder—Remain.&quot;" href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/08/100819-us-hurricane-katrina-anniversary-vin-video/">video: "Five Years After Katrina, Ruins—And a Natural Wonder—Remain."</a>)</p><p>Katrina, the most destructive and costliest natural disaster yet to occur in the United States, killed more than 1,800 people. In total, five million people were affected by the storm and its aftermath, according to Harvard University's <a id="z0qt" title="Hurricane Katrina Hurricane Advisory Group" href="http://www.hurricanekatrina.med.harvard.edu/">Hurricane Katrina Community Advisory Group</a>.</p>

Hurricane Katrina Waiting Game

The New Orleans Saints play a preseason game Saturday against the Houston Texans in the Louisiana Superdome (top)—a whole different ball game from five years ago, when the stadium was a makeshift shelter for victims of Hurricane Katrina. (See a picture of the torn-apart Superdome roof right after the storm.)

As the fifth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina's Gulf Coast landfall approaches, many hurricane survivors are still homeless, according to a new report by the homeless-advocacy group Unity of Greater New Orleans, local TV station WWLV.com reported.

Hundreds of Katrina victims are living in the more than 55,000 ramshackle buildings that were abandoned after the hurricane destroyed much of the city, according to the report.

(Related video: "Five Years After Katrina, Ruins—And a Natural Wonder—Remain.")

Katrina, the most destructive and costliest natural disaster yet to occur in the United States, killed more than 1,800 people. In total, five million people were affected by the storm and its aftermath, according to Harvard University's Hurricane Katrina Community Advisory Group.

Photographs by Mario Tama, Getty Images

Hurricane Katrina Pictures: Then & Now, Ruin & Rebirth

Houses wiped off the map, submerged islands, and flooded cemeteries—see how sites hit by Hurricane Katrina five years ago are faring in 2010.

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