<p>Partly a <a href="http://voices.nationalgeographic.com/2014/05/27/nasa-unveils-selfie-of-earth-created-with-tens-of-thousands-of-individual-pictures/">selfie</a>, this wide-angle image reveals <a href="http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2013/12/131209-curiosity-mars-takeaways-science-life-space/">NASA's Curiosity Mars rover</a> hard at work on the <a href="http://science.nationalgeographic.com/science/space/solar-system/mars-article/">red planet</a>. The rover's drill is seen moving into position for a test on a rock that scientists have named Mojave.</p><p dir="ltr">If the rock proves drillable, the rover will cut deeper and retrieve a sample for analysis. The image was made on January 13 during the 867th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars.</p><p dir="ltr">The rock is in the Pink Hills region on Mount Sharp, another part of which is visible on the horizon. Planetary scientists are interested in the area because it appears to hold unusual crystal-shaped material. (<a href="http://video.nationalgeographic.com/video/news/mars-curiosity-rover-vin">Watch a video of Curiosity's dramatic landing</a>.)</p><p dir="ltr">Curiosity blasted off from Earth on November 26, 2011, and landed on Mars's Gale Crater on August 6, 2012.</p><p dir="ltr"><em><strong>—</strong>By Brian Clark Howard, photo gallery by Nicole Werbeck</em></p>

Drill Test

Partly a selfie, this wide-angle image reveals NASA's Curiosity Mars rover hard at work on the red planet. The rover's drill is seen moving into position for a test on a rock that scientists have named Mojave.

If the rock proves drillable, the rover will cut deeper and retrieve a sample for analysis. The image was made on January 13 during the 867th Martian day, or sol, of Curiosity's work on Mars.

The rock is in the Pink Hills region on Mount Sharp, another part of which is visible on the horizon. Planetary scientists are interested in the area because it appears to hold unusual crystal-shaped material. (Watch a video of Curiosity's dramatic landing.)

Curiosity blasted off from Earth on November 26, 2011, and landed on Mars's Gale Crater on August 6, 2012.

By Brian Clark Howard, photo gallery by Nicole Werbeck

Photograph by NASA/JPL-Caltech

Week's Best Space Pictures: Curiosity Drills, a Rocket Soars, and Dragon Docks

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