On the left are the western agricultural terraces. Above them is the Sacred Plaza, with the Chief Temple and the three-windowed temple to the right of it. Above these and connected with them by the finest stairway in Machu Picchu is the sacred hill, on which is located the Intihuatana, or sun dial stone. In the central picture in the immediate foreground are the rough boulders near which we found most of the little bronze pins and artifacts. Above them are the terraced gardens and a thatched hut built by the modern Indians. Above this in turn is one of the most densely crowded portions of the city, while to the right above the long stairway is the group called the Private Garden Group, and below it, on the extreme right, the group characterized by greatest ingenuity in its stonework. The beautiful peak of Huayna Picchu overshadows the city like a sentinel. On its summit were found a few rough caves whence guards could give warning of approaching danger.

This Picture Gives a General View of About One-Half of the City of Machu Picchu

On the left are the western agricultural terraces. Above them is the Sacred Plaza, with the Chief Temple and the three-windowed temple to the right of it. Above these and connected with them by the finest stairway in Machu Picchu is the sacred hill, on which is located the Intihuatana, or sun dial stone. In the central picture in the immediate foreground are the rough boulders near which we found most of the little bronze pins and artifacts. Above them are the terraced gardens and a thatched hut built by the modern Indians. Above this in turn is one of the most densely crowded portions of the city, while to the right above the long stairway is the group called the Private Garden Group, and below it, on the extreme right, the group characterized by greatest ingenuity in its stonework. The beautiful peak of Huayna Picchu overshadows the city like a sentinel. On its summit were found a few rough caves whence guards could give warning of approaching danger.
Photograph by Hiram Bingham

In the wonderland of Peru—rediscovering Machu Picchu

The work accomplished by the Peruvian Expedition of 1912, under the auspices of Yale University and the National Geographic Society.

In 1911, while engaged in a search for Vitcos, the last Inca capital, I went down the Urubamba Valley asking for reports as to the whereabouts of ruins.

The first day out from Cuzco saw us in Urubamba, the capital of a province, a modern town charmingly located a few miles below Yucay, which was famous for being the most highly prized winter resort of the Cuzco Incas. The next day brought us to Ollantaytambo, vividly described by Squier in his interesting book on Peru. Its ancient fortress, perched on a rocky eminence that commands a magnificent view up and down the valley, is still one of the most attractive ancient monuments in America.

Continuing on down the valley over a newly constructed government trail, we found ourselves in a wonderful cañon. So lofty are the peaks on either side that although the trail was frequently shadowed by dense tropical jungle, many of the mountains were capped with snow, and some of them had glaciers. There is no valley in South America that has such varied beauties and so many charms.

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